Comics, Manga, and Graphic Novels: A History of Graphic Narratives

A History of Graphic Narratives

Comics, Manga, and Graphic Novels: A History of Graphic Narratives

This text examines comics, graphic novels, and manga with a broad, international scope that reveals their conceptual origins in antiquity. • Includes numerous illustrations of British satirical prints, Japanese woodblock prints, and the art of prominent illustrators • Includes a chapter on the latest developments in digital comics

Transnational Perspectives on Graphic Narratives

Comics at the Crossroads

Transnational Perspectives on Graphic Narratives

This book brings together an international group of scholars who chart and analyze the ways in which comic book history and new forms of graphic narrative have negotiated the aesthetic, social, political, economic, and cultural interactions that reach across national borders in an increasingly interconnected and globalizing world. Exploring the tendencies of graphic narratives - from popular comic book serials and graphic novels to manga - to cross national and cultural boundaries, Transnational Perspectives on Graphic Narratives addresses a previously marginalized area in comics studies. By placing graphic narratives in the global flow of cultural production and reception, the book investigates controversial representations of transnational politics, examines transnational adaptations of superhero characters, and maps many of the translations and transformations that have come to shape contemporary comics culture on a global scale.

Cultures of War in Graphic Novels

Violence, Trauma, and Memory

Cultures of War in Graphic Novels

Cultures of War in Graphic Novels examines the representation of small-scale and often less acknowledged conflicts from around the world and throughout history. The contributors look at an array of graphic novels about conflicts such as the Boxer Rebellion (1899-1901), the Irish struggle for national independence (1916-1998), the Falkland War (1982), the Bosnian War (1992-1995), the Rwandan genocide (1994), the Israel-Lebanon War (2006), and the War on Terror (2001-). The book explores the multi-layered relation between the graphic novel as a popular medium and war as a pivotal recurring experience in human history. The focus on largely overlooked small-scale conflicts contributes not only to advance our understanding of graphic novels about war and the cultural aspects of war as reflected in graphic novels, but also our sense of the early twenty-first century, in which popular media and limited conflicts have become closely interrelated.

Encyclopedia of Comic Books and Graphic Novels

Encyclopedia of Comic Books and Graphic Novels

Arranged alphabetically, offers 340 signed entries focusing on English-language comics with special emphasis on the new graphic novel format that emerged in the 1970s.

The Bloomsbury Introduction to Popular Fiction

The Bloomsbury Introduction to Popular Fiction

Guiding readers through key writers and genres, historical contexts and major theoretical approaches, this is a comprehensive introduction to the study of popular fiction. Charting the rise of commercial fiction from the 19th century to today, The Bloomsbury Introduction to Popular Fiction includes introductory surveys, written by leading scholars, to a wide range of popular genres, including: Science Fiction Crime Writing Romance and Chick Lit Adventure Stories and Lad Lit Horror Graphic Novels Children's Literature Part II of the book also includes case-study readings of key writers and texts, from the work of HG Wells, Ian Fleming and Raymond Chandler to more recent books such as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. The book also includes a chapter covering "The Writer's Perspective" on popular publishing, while annotated guides to further reading and online resources throughout give students the tools they need to pursue independent study on their courses.

Graphic Novels and Comics in the Classroom

Essays on the Educational Power of Sequential Art

Graphic Novels and Comics in the Classroom

Sequential art combines the visual and the narrative in a way that readers have to interpret the images with the writing. Comics make a good fit with education because students are using a format that provides active engagement. This collection of essays is a wide-ranging look at current practices using comics and graphic novels in educational settings, from elementary schools through college. The contributors cover history, gender, the use of specific graphic novels, practical application and educational theory.

Graphic Details

Jewish Women’s Confessional Comics in Essays and Interviews

Graphic Details

The comics within capture in intimate, often awkward, but always relatable detail the tribulations and triumphs of life. In particular, the lives of 18 Jewish women artists who bare all in their work, which appeared in the internationally acclaimed exhibition “Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women.” The comics are enhanced by original essays and interviews with the artists that provide further insight into the creation of autobiographical comics that resonate beyond self, beyond gender, and beyond ethnicity.

A Comics Studies Reader

A Comics Studies Reader

A survey of the best scholars writing on the form, craft, history, and significance of the comics

Drawing New Color Lines

Transnational Asian American Graphic Narratives

Drawing New Color Lines

The global circulation of comics, manga, and other such visual mediums between North America and Asia produces transnational meanings no longer rooted in a separation between "Asian" and "American." Drawing New Color Lines explores the culture, production, and history of contemporary graphic narratives that depict Asian Americans and Asians. It examines how Japanese manga and Asian popular culture have influenced Asian American comics; how these comics and Asian American graphic narratives depict the "look" of race; and how these various representations are interpreted in nations not of their production. By focusing on what graphic narratives mean for audiences in North America and those in Asia, the collection discusses how Western theories about the ways in which graphic narratives might successfully overturn derogatory caricatures are themselves based on contested assumptions; and illustrates that the so-called odorless images featured in Japanese manga might nevertheless elicit interpretations about race in transnational contexts. With contributions from experts based in North America and Asia, Drawing New Color Lines will be of interest to scholars in a variety of disciplines, including Asian American studies, cultural and literary studies, comics and visual studies. "Drawing New Color Lines makes an exciting contribution to the rapidly expanding inquiry at the crossroads of Asian American literary studies, graphic narrative studies, and transnational studies. Foregrounding the shifting meanings of race within, across, and between various national contexts, the fifteen essays in Chiu's collection explore the visual dimensions of Asian American transnational literary culture with originality and offer particular insight into the complexities of production, interpretation, and reception for graphic narrative." — Pamela Thoma, author of Asian American Women's Popular Literature: Feminizing Genres and Neoliberal Belonging "An informative, smart, and necessary collection. Drawing New Color Lines investigates a growing and important field—transnational Asian American comics—with sophistication and breadth." — Hillary Chute, author of Graphic Women: Life Narrative and Contemporary Comics and Outside the Box: Interviews with Contemporary Cartoonists

Graven Images

Religion in Comic Books & Graphic Novels

Graven Images

Comic books have increasingly become a vehicle for serious social commentary and, specifically, for innovative religious thought. Practitioners of both traditional religions and new religious movements have begun to employ comics as a missionary tool, while humanists and religious progressives use comics' unique fusion of text and image to criticize traditional theologies and to offer alternatives. Addressing the increasing fervor with which the public has come to view comics as an art form and Americans' fraught but passionate relationship with religion, Graven Images explores with real insight the roles of religion in comic books and graphic novels. In essays by scholars and comics creators, Graven Images observes the frequency with which religious material—in devout, educational, satirical, or critical contexts—occurs in both independent and mainstream comics. Contributors identify the unique advantages of the comics medium for religious messages; analyze how comics communicate such messages; place the religious messages contained in comic books in appropriate cultural, social, and historical frameworks; and articulate the significance of the innovative theologies being developed in comics.