Debt - Updated and Expanded

The First 5,000 Years

Debt - Updated and Expanded

Now in paperback, the updated and expanded edition: David Graeber’s “fresh . . . fascinating . . . thought-provoking . . . and exceedingly timely” (Financial Times) history of debt Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom: he shows that before there was money, there was debt. For more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods—that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors. Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like “guilt,” “sin,” and “redemption”) derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it.

From Debt to Riches

Steps to Financial Success

From Debt to Riches

Arguing that anyone can become financially independent through self-discipline, this indispensible guide addresses the financial problems of ordinary South Africans who are struggling with garnishment orders, debt counseling, university fees, and home loans. With simple tips and tricks, this book will help reader achieve financial success.

Debt Or Equity?

How Firms in Developing Countries Choose

Debt Or Equity?

IFC Discussion Paper No. 22. Corporate finance in emerging market countries is changing dramatically as the recent liberalizations revitalize stagnant domestic capital markets and permit increased access to overseas markets. With this trend evi

Debt

The First 5,000 Years

Debt

Now in paperback: David Graeber’s “fresh . . . fascinating . . . thought-provoking . . . and exceedingly timely” (Financial Times) history of debt Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom: he shows that before there was money, there was debt. For more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods—that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors. Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like “guilt,” “sin,” and “redemption”) derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it.

Effective Domestic Debt Management in Developing Countries

Effective Domestic Debt Management in Developing Countries

This publication is a compendium of discussions and papers presented in three regional workshops on Effective Domestic Debt Management conducted by the Commonwealth Secretariat between 1996 and 1998. The object of the workshops was to help developing countries to manage their domestic debt more effectively. It is the first in a series of publications to be produced by the Commonwealth Secretariat on debt issues.

Debt Overhang Or Debt Irrelevance? Revisiting the Debt Growth Link

Debt Overhang Or Debt Irrelevance? Revisiting the Debt Growth Link

Do Highly Indebted Poor Countries (HIPCs) suffer from a debt overhang? Is debt relief going to improve their growth rates? To answer these important questions, we look at how the debt-growth relationship varies with indebtedness levels and other country characteristics in a panel of developing countries. Our findings suggest that there is a negative marginal relationship between debt and growth at intermediate levels of debt, but not at very low debt levels, below the “debt overhang” threshold, or at very high levels, above the “debt irrelevance” threshold. Countries with good policies and institutions face overhang when debt rises above 15-30 percent of GDP, but the marginal effect of debt on growth becomes irrelevant above 70-80 percent. In countries with bad policies and institutions, overhang and irrelevance thresholds seem to be lower, but we cannot rule out the possibility that debt does not matter at all.

Handbook of Debt Management

Handbook of Debt Management

Examining various methods of debt management used in the US., Handbook of Debt Management, provides a comprehensive analysis of securities offered for sale by municipalities, states, and the federal government. The book covers laws regarding municipal bonds, the economic choice between debt and taxes and the tax-exempt status of municipal bond owners, capital budgeting, including state and local government practices, developing governmental and intergovernmental debt policies, pay-as-you-go with debt financing for capital projects, US Internal Revenue Service regulations on arbitrage in state and local government debt proceeds investment, US treasury auctions, and more.

The Debt Trap in Nigeria

Towards a Sustainable Debt Strategy

The Debt Trap in Nigeria

The first major study to put the debt question in perspective, this book is the outcome of a historic conference held in May 2001 to debate Nigeria's future in the context of the debt overhang. The book captures the highlights of all presentations, and presents the recommendations and consensus reached concerning reducing the debt burden, strengthening the institutional framework for debt and resource management, and resuming sustainable development, ultimately demanding that Nigeria and the international community refocus their resources on fighting poverty.

A Primer on Sovereign Debt Buybacks and Swaps

A Primer on Sovereign Debt Buybacks and Swaps

This paper sets forth some basic principles that could help debt managers in emerging market and other countries to plan and implement sovereign debt buyback and swap operations. It discusses the macroeconomic context in which buybacks and swaps are undertaken, the objectives of buybacks and swaps, the analytical framework for deciding whether to undertake a particular buyback or swap operation and for selecting among alternative operations, and some key issues in the determination of the strategy for executing buybacks and swaps. The focus is on developing the analytical framework for evaluating sovereign debt buyback and swap operations, since very little work has been done in this area. In this regard, the paper presents a step-wise decision-making procedure, in which discounted cash flow analysis and the use of strategic benchmarks for the debt play central roles.

Corporate Debt Capacity

A Study of Corporate Debt Policy and the Determination of Corporate Debt Capacity

Corporate Debt Capacity