Hokusai, First Manga Master

Hokusai, First Manga Master

More than a hundred years before Japanese comics swept the globe, the master engraver Hokusai was producing beautiful, surreal, and often downright wacky sketches and drawings, filled with many of the characters and themes found in modern manga. These out-of-context caricatures, which include studies of facial expressions, postures, and situations ranging from the mundane to the otherworldly, demonstrate both the artist's style and his taste. In addition to the landscapes for which he is beloved, Hokusai's mangas reveal his compassion for farmers, artisans, and peasants, as well as his keen eye for the absurd.

Art of Hokusai

Explore His Life and Legacy and Learn to Paint in His Unique Style

Art of Hokusai

Beautifully illustrated throughout, Art of Hokusai takes you through his life, his work, his inspirations, and his legacy. Katsushika Hokusai (1760-May 10, 1849) was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and printmaker of the Edo period. In his time he was Japan's leading expert on Chinese painting. Then, create your own masterpieces using Hokusai's basic painting techniques as well as his unique color theory. Use helpful templates on perforated pages to transfer your favorite Hokusai paintings onto separate canvas or paper that are large enough to mount and frame. Learn to paint classic, traditional Asian art in the style of the master, Hokusai. This book is a lovely addition to any artist's library.

Manga and the Representation of Japanese History

Manga and the Representation of Japanese History

"This edited collection explores how graphic art and in particular Japanese manga represent Japanese history. The articles explore the representation of history in manga from disciplines that include such diverse fields as literary studies, politics, history, cultural studies, linguistics, narratology, and semiotics. Despite this diversity of approaches all academics from these respective fields of study agree that manga pose a peculiarly contemporary appeal that transcends the limitation imposed by traditional approaches to the study and teaching of history. The representation of history via manga in Japan has a long and controversial historiographical dimension. Thereby manga and by extension graphic art in Japanese culture has become one of the world's most powerful modes of expressing contemporary historical verisimilitude. The strategy of combining the narrative elements of writing with graphic art, the extensive narrative story-manga and its Western equivalent of the graphic novel, reflects the relatively new soft power of 'global' media, which have the potential to display history in previously unimagined ways. Boundaries of space and time in manga become as permeable as societies and cultures across the world. Each of the articles in this book investigates the authorship of history by looking at various different attempts to render Japanese history through the popular cultural media of the story-manga. As Carol Gluck, Tessa Morris-Suzuki, Susan Napier and others have shown, it has never been easyto encapsulate the complex narrative of emperor-based cyclical Japanese historical periods. The contributors to this volume elaborate how manga and by extension graphic art rewrites, reinvents and re-imagines the historicity and dialectic of bygone epochs in postwar/contemporary Japan. "--

Crossing Boundaries in Tokugawa Society

Suzuki Bokushi, a Rural Elite Commoner

Crossing Boundaries in Tokugawa Society

Crossing Boundaries in Tokugawa Society presents a vivid picure of the life of Suzuki Bokushi (1770-1842), an elite villager in a snowy province of Japan, focusing on his interaction with the changing social and cultural environment of the late Tokugawa period (1603-1868).

Choice

Choice


Hokusai's Lost Manga

Hokusai's Lost Manga

A mysterious 1823 advertisement for illustrated books by renowned artist Katsushika Hokusai refers to an otherwise unknown work called Master Iitsu's Chicken-Rib Picture Book. According to the ad, the book was conceived in the same year that the final volume of Hokusai's famous Manga series was supposed to have been published. Many therefore believe that the Chicken-Rib Picture Book was meant to be a continuation of the famous series, but a published copy of it has never been found. This eclectic and engaging collection of drawings from the peerless Japanese art collection at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, was likely intended for that lost book. It includes the sort of lively, behind-the-scenes sketches of daily life that have made the Manga series so beloved, as well as imaginatively conceived sea creatures, refined flowers, deities, heroes, and a variety of craftspeople and labourers. Reproduced here in full for the first time as a stand-alone volume, this rare sketchbook of Hokusai drawings makes for delightful fare.

Geek in Japan

Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony

Geek in Japan

For every fan of manga, anime, J-pop, or Zen, A Geek in Japan is a hip, smart and concise guide to the land that is their source. Comprehensive and well informed, it covers a wide array of topics in short articles accompanied by sidebars and numerous photographs, providing a lively digest of the society and culture of Japan. Designed to appeal to the generations of Westerners who grew up on Pokemon, manga and video games, A Geek in Japan reinvents the culture guide for readers in the Internet age. Spotlighting the originality and creativity of the Japanese, debunking myths about them, and answering nagging questions like why they're so fond of robots, author Hector Garcia has created the perfect book for the growing ranks of Japanophiles in this inspired, insightful and highly informative guide.

Hokusai

Life and Work

Hokusai

Om den japanske maler og grafiker Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849).

Hokusai

Hokusai

Without a doubt, Katsushika Hokusai is the most famous Japanese artist since the middle of the nineteenth century whose art is known to the Western world. Reflecting the artistic expression of an isolated civilisation, the works of Hokusai - one of the first Japanese artists to emerge in Europe - greatly influenced the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painters, such as Vincent van Gogh. Considered during his life as a living Ukiyo-e master, Hokusai fascinates us with the variety and the significance of his work, which spanned almost ninety years and is presented here in all its breadth and diversity.