Hokusai X Manga

Japanese Pop Culture Since 1680

Hokusai X Manga

Anime and manga are powerful pop-culture phenomena, capturing people s imaginations in the pages of comic books, on television and smartphone screens, and at cosplay festivals, where children and adults alike don elaborate costumes and share creations based on the original art. Somewhere along the way, many of these cute, stylized characters jumped the Pacific, and we too became smitten with Hello Kitty and collecting adorable Pokemon. But this isn t the first time artists embraced popular culture and enjoyed enormous commercial success. In the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, Hokusai, Kuniyoshi, and their contemporaries produced colored woodblock prints of beautiful courtesans and brave Samurai for the masses. Hokusai x Manga offers fascinating insight into the most widely consumed examples of popular culture in the history of Japanese art. Woodblock prints, or ukiyo-e, were a central medium of early mass culture, and they served as a fantastical escape from everyday life. As Japan transformed into a modern nation and society, the demand for popular art didn t disappear, and the forms were merely adapted from one cultural context to another, changing to reflect the high-energy urban streets of Tokyo, but retaining many of the basic elements. Dozens of lively, colorful images from shunga sheets to selected excerpts from manga by Jiro Taniguchi, Inio Asano, and more are interspersed throughout the book, making Hokusai x Manga as fun to read as it is informative. Hokusai x Manga will give Japanophiles and pop-culture enthusiasts everywhere an entirely new perspective and on these captivating chapters in the history of Japanese art. "

Hokusai

Life and Work

Hokusai

Om den japanske maler og grafiker Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849).

Hokusai

Hokusai

Without a doubt, Katsushika Hokusai is the most famous Japanese artist since the middle of the nineteenth century whose art is known to the Western world. Reflecting the artistic expression of an isolated civilisation, the works of Hokusai - one of the first Japanese artists to emerge in Europe - greatly influenced the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painters, such as Vincent van Gogh. Considered during his life as a living Ukiyo-e master, Hokusai fascinates us with the variety and the significance of his work, which spanned almost ninety years and is presented here in all its breadth and diversity.

Hokusai

Hokusai

Without a doubt, Katsushika Hokusai is the most famous Japanese artist since the middle of the nineteenth century whose art is known to the Western world. Reflecting the artistic expression of an isolated civilisation, the works of Hokusai - one of the first Japanese artists to emerge in Europe - greatly influenced the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painters, such as Vincent van Gogh. Considered during his life as a living Ukiyo-e master, Hokusai fascinates us with the variety and the significance of his work, which spanned almost ninety years and is presented here in all its breadth and diversity.

Navigating Argument: A Guidebook to Academic Writing

Navigating Argument: A Guidebook to Academic Writing

Written for Tusculum College students, this guidebook will help you to navigate the often-confusing and tangled paths of academic writing. From your freshman composition sequence through your senior seminar course, you should plan to use the strategies taught in this book to complete a variety of writing assignments including rhetorical analyses, standard arguments, research papers, annotated bibliographies, and proposals. Each chapter will walk you through the steps necessary to navigate these different writing types. Additionally, you will be introduced to the writing process, including methods of prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing. This process will help you in any kind of writing you undertake.

Hokusai

Hokusai


Hokusai and His School

Paintings, Drawings and Illustrated Books : Catalogue

Hokusai and His School


Ehon

The Artist and the Book in Japan

Ehon

Ehon - or "picture books"- are part of an incomparable 1,200-year-old Japanese tradition. Created by artists and craftsmen, most ehon also feature essays, poems, or other texts written in beautiful, distinctive calligraphy. They are by nature collaborations: visual artists, calligraphers, writers, and designers join forces with papermakers, binders, block cutters, and printers. The books they create are strikingly beautiful, highly charged microcosms of deep feeling, sharp intensity, and extraordinary intelligence. In the elegant, richly illustrated Ehon: The Artist and the Book in Japan, renowned scholar Roger S. Keyes traces the history and evolution of these remarkable books through seventy key works, including many great rarities and unique masterpieces, from the Spencer Collection of the New York Public Library, one of the foremost collections of Japanese illustrated books in the West. The earliest ehon were made as religious offerings or talismans, but their great flowering began in the early modern period (1600-1868) and has continued, with new media and new styles and subjects, to the present. Shiohi no tsuto (Gifts of the Ebb Tide, 1789; often called The Shell Book) by Kitagawa Utamaro, one of the supreme achievements of the ehon tradition, is reproduced in full. Michimori (ca. 1604), a luxuriously produced libretto for a No play is also featured, as are Saito- Shu-ho's cheerful Kishi empu (Mr. Ginger's Book of Love, 1803), Kamisaka Sekka's brilliant Momoyogusa (Flowers of a Hundred Worlds, 1910), and many more. Ehon: The Artist and the Book in Japan ends with ehon by some of the most innovative practitioners of the twentieth century. Among these are Chizu (The Map, 1965), Kawada Kikuji's profound photographic requiem for Hiroshima; Yoko Tawada's and Stephan Kohler's affecting Ein Gedicht für ein Buch (A Poem for a Book, 1996); and Vija Celmins's and Eliot Weinberger's Hoshi (The Stars, 2005). The magnificent ehon tradition originated in Japan and developed there under very specific conditions, but it has long since burst its bounds, like any living tradition. Ehon: The Artist and the Book in Japan suggests that when artists meet readers in these contrived, protected, focused, sacred book "worlds," the possibilities for pleasure, insight, and inspiration are limitless. Ehon: The Artist and the Book in Japan was praised as "illuminating" in The New York Times' review of the New York Public Library's exhibit. http://travel2.nytimes.com/2006/10/21/arts/design/21ehon.html

Hokusai drawings

Hokusai drawings