Power Game

How Washington Works

Power Game

Washington, D.C. The one city that affects all our lives. The one city where the game has only one name: Power. Hedrick Smith, the Pulitzer Prize-winning ex-Washington bureau chief of The New York Times, takes us inside the beltway to show who wields the most power—and for what ends. The Power Game explains how some members of Congress have built personal fortunes on PAC money, how Michael Deaver was just the tip of the influence-peddling iceberg, how “dissidents” in the Pentagon work to keep the generals honest, how insiders and “leakers” use the Times and The Washington Post and their personal bulletin boards. Congressional staffers more powerful than their bosses, media advisors more powerful than the media, money that not only talks but intimidated and threatens. That’s Washington. That’s The Power Game. Praise for Power Game “The Power Game may be the most sweeping and in many ways the most impressive portrait of the culture of the federal government to appear in a single work in many decades. . . . Knowledgeable and informative.”—The New York Times Book Review “There are oodles of good yarns in this book about the nature of power and the eccentricities that accompany it. . . . Delightfully fresh . . . [Hedrick] Smith is a superb writer.”—The Washington Post “Not only the inside stuff, but the insightful stuff—an original view of the power playing.”—William Safire

The Power Game

Ireland Under Fianna Fáil

The Power Game

New Updated Edition The Power Game lifts the lid on the modern struggles for power within Fianna Fáil, including the heaves against Charles Haughey and the shafting of Albert Reynolds. It also explores in detail the careers of Jack Lynch, Charles Haughey, Albert Reynolds and Bertie Ahern, and looks at the impact on the party of the explosive revelations at the judicial tribunals about the extent of corruption in Irish public life. New material: Stephen Collins examines the most recent disclosures concerning the arms crisis of 1970 and information released from the military archives.

Power Game

Power Game

'Stepping back into Feehan's Ghostwalker series was like putting on an old, comfy pair of slippers that you just found hiding under the bed . . . you stick your feet in them and ahhh . . . heaven!' Book Chick City 'Thrilling... Treachery and betrayal continue to stalk the GhostWalker teams, keeping the danger quotient high.' RT Book Reviews When members of a United Nations joint security force are taken hostage by radical terrorists in Indonesia, Captain Ezekiel Fortunes is called to lead the rescue team. Part of a classified government experiment, Zeke is a supersoldier with enhanced abilities. He can see better and run faster than the enemy, disappear when necessary and hunt along any terrain. There are those in the world willing to do anything for power like that... A formidable spy genetically engineered to hide in plain sight, Bellisia rarely meets a man who doesn't want to control her or kill her. But Zeke is different. His gaze, his touch - they awaken feelings inside her that she never thought possible. He's the kind of man she could settle down with - if she can keep him alive...

The daily power game

The daily power game

Politicians, social scientists, entrepreneurs, trade unionists, church leaders, philosophers, all of us in fact have caused such vast vague ness and confusion about the term 'power' that this can hardly be attributed to mere chance. Apparently, there is so much at stake, whenever we think about power or are involved, that it may be worth our while to keep the concept blurred. This is most clearly seen in social science. Power, inequality in power, struggle for power are a kind of prime movers in social life, but power problems have seldom been studied, compared to the research done on other subjects, such as satisfaction about personal achievement, perception, mental processes, achievement motivation, cultural differences, etc. Power appears to be under a taboo in society and most social scientists agree not to discuss it (ref. 23, pp. 55 and 56). Whatever research there has been reveals the peculiar trend of restricting itself to the study of power differences and power struggles as world- or macro-problems. Studies of mondial problems have covered rela tions between America and the Soviet Union, or between rich and poor countries. China has also been included of late. The studies on macrostructural problems will cover subjects like the power of particular groups within the nation, such as retired army generals and politicians working in various sectors of trade and industry (ref. 21, pp. 11 and 281), or the number of representatives of large banks on the advisory boards of other companies (ref. 22).

The Power Game

A Novel

The Power Game

The final novel in a fast-paced and gripping historical crime trilogy from the legendary Thomas Keneally and his eldest daughter, Meg Keneally. Set in 1825 during Australia's colonial period at the notorious Port Macquarie penal colony, The Power Game is the thrilling conclusion to the whip-smart mystery series from the "greatest living practitioner of historical fiction" (Christian Science Monitor).

TranscEnding the Global Power Game

Hidden Agendas, Divine Intervention, and the New Earth

TranscEnding the Global Power Game

Whatever happens on the visible plane has its roots in invisible dimensions; reality is more than meets the eye. This is the essence of all spiritual teachings and mystery schools, and it is the key to understanding what actually happens on the stage of the global power game. Here, in a unique compendium, you get to know what the world looks like when seen from this paranormal viewpoint. Step by step, the author unfolds stunning insights into the hidden dimensions of secret politics, money manipulations, and the ongoing transformation. The pieces are put together to reveal an exciting puzzle: Topics Include: Ancient knowledge and new revelations The conclusive meaning of the symbolism of light and darkness The ideology of the Illuminati The roots and goals of today?s secret societies Prophecies regarding money and the crash Alien forces and the presence of lightbeings Our role in this cosmic drama ?Had Armin Risi lived in classical times, he would now be counted among the great philosophers and theologians. Being a contemporary author, however, he is able to go beyond classical philosophy and shed light on problems, coverups, and challenges of today, using a revolutionary logic, or mytho-logic, as he calls it. ? Professor Jorg Rehberg, Zurich

The Power Game in Byzantium

Antonina and the Empress Theodora

The Power Game in Byzantium

This title presents an original portrayal of Justinian's reign, its politics and theological disputes, focusing on the lives of two extraordinary women who wielded power and influence. A fascinating exploration of the corridors of power in Byzantium of the time of Justinian (527-565), the book reveals how Empress Theodora and Antonina, both alumnae of the theatre, were remarkable examples of social mobility, moving into positions of power and influence, becoming wives of key figures. Theodora had three aims: to protect those Christians who would not accept the Chalcedonian Creed; to advance the careers of her family and friends; and to defend the poor and assist the defenceless and, in particular, women - a mission which she claimed publicly. Finally, there was the allure of power, and though the exercise of power cannot be qualified as an 'aim', there can be no doubt that Theodora loved authority: she made and unmade marriage contracts, and appointed men to office, or destroyed them if they got in her way. Antonina was both friend and agent, and equally ruthless. She managed her husband, Belisarius, and advanced his career, though she was unfaithful to the marriage bed, and would outlive the main players of the age of Justinian.

Canada in the Great Power Game 1914-2014

Canada in the Great Power Game 1914-2014

Canada in the Great Power Game 1914-2014 is a serious contemplation of what it means to engage in major world conflicts, and the price we pay when we do. The First World War was Canada's baptism of fire, or at least the only one that people now remember. (Montrealers in 1776 or Torontonians in 1814 would have taken a different view.) From 1914 to 1918, after a century of peace, Canadians were plunged back into the old world of great power rivalries and great wars. So was everybody else, but Canadians were volunteers. We didn't have to fight, but we chose to, out of loyalty to ideas and institutions that today many of us no longer believe in. And we have been doing the same thing ever since, although we haven't quite given up on the latest set of ideas and institutions yet. In Canada in the Great Power Game, Gwynne Dyer moves back and forth between the seminal event, the First World War, and all the later conflicts that Canada chose to fight in. He draws parallels between these conflicts, with the same idealism among the young soldiers, and the same deeply conflicted emotions among the survivors, surfacing time and again in every war right down to Afghanistan. And in each case, the same arguments pro and con arise--mostly from people who are a long, safe way from the killing grounds--for every one of those "wars of choice." Echoing throughout the book are the voices of the people who lived through the wars: the veterans, the politicians, the historians, the eyewitnesses. And Dyer takes a number of so-called excursions from his historical account, in which he revisits the events and puts them in context, pausing to ask such questions as "What if we hadn't fought Hitler?" and "Is war written in our genes?" This entertaining and provocative book casts an unsparing eye over what happens when Canada and the great powers get in the war business, illuminating much about how we see ourselves on the world stage.

Power Games

A Critical Sociology of Sport

Power Games

Critical and radical perspectives have been central to the emergence of the sociology of sport as a discipline in its own right. This ground-breaking new book is the first to offer a comprehensive theory and method for a critical sociology of sport. It argues that class, political economy, hegemony and other concepts central to the radical tradition are essential for framing, understanding and changing social and political relations within sport and between sport and society. The book draws upon the disciplines of politics, sociology, history and philosophy to provide a critical analysis of power relations throughout the world of sport, while offering important new case studies from such diverse sporting contexts as the Olympics, world football, boxing, cricket, tennis and windsurfing. In the process, it addresses key topics such as: * nations and nationalism * globalisation * race * gender * political economy. Power Games can be used as a complete introduction to the study of sport and society. And will be essential reading for any serious student of sport. At the same time, it is a provocative book that by argument and example challenges those who research and write about sport to make their work relevant to social and political reform.