The Secret Holocaust Diaries

The Untold Story of Nonna Bannister

The Secret Holocaust Diaries

The author documents her experiences during World War II through a secret diary she kept during her time in a concentration camp and the years following the war.

Children in the Holocaust and World War II

Their Secret Diaries

Children in the Holocaust and World War II

Children in the Holocaust and World War II is an extraordinary, unprecedented anthology of diaries written by children all across Nazi-occupied Europe and in England. Twenty-three young people, ages ten through eighteen, recount in vivid detail the horrors they lived through, day after day. As powerful as The Diary of Anne Frank and Zlata's Diary, here are children's experiences—all written with an unguarded eloquence that belies their years. The diarists include a Hungarian girl, selected by Mengele to be put in a line of prisoners who were tortured and murdered; a Danish Christian boy executed by the Nazis for his partisan work; and a twelve-year-old Dutch boy who lived through the Blitzkrieg in Rotterdam. In the Janowska death camp, eleven-year-old Pole Janina Heshele so inspired her fellow prisoners with the power of her poetry that they found a way to save her from the Nazi ovens. Mary Berg was imprisoned at sixteen in the Warsaw ghetto even though her mother was American and Christian. She left an eyewitness record of ghetto atrocities, a diary she was able to smuggle out of captivity. Moshe Flinker, a sixteen-year-old Netherlander, was betrayed by an informer who led the Gestapo to his family's door; Moshe and his parents died in Auschwitz in 1944. They come from Czechoslovakia, Austria, Israel, Poland, Holland, Belgium, Hungary, Lithuania, Russia, England, and Denmark. They write in spare, searing prose of life in ghettos and concentration camps, of bombings and Blitzkriegs, of fear and courage, tragedy and transcendence. Their voices and their vision ennoble us all.

Nazi Concentration Camps: A Policy of Genocide

Nazi Concentration Camps: A Policy of Genocide

Concentration camps, the epicenters of Nazi atrocities, represent a harrowing chapter of world and human history. Part of a highly organized system intended to decimate Europe’s Jewish population and other groups deemed undesirable by Adolf Hitler’s regime, these detention and extermination facilities enabled genocide to a degree never before seen in modern history. This volume chronicles the development of the concentration camp system and examines the various types of camps, the deplorable conditions and treatment the camps’ victims faced, and the aftermath of the Holocaust. Documentation and eyewitness accounts from survivors and camp liberators supplement the narrative and highlight the horrors of the camps.

The Warsaw Ghetto and Uprising

The Warsaw Ghetto and Uprising

The German invasion of Poland in 1939 gave the Nazis the opportunity to implement their master plan to eliminate Europe's Jews. Part of the plan encompassed confining the Jews in a restricted area of Warsaw to make their survival difficult, followed by mass transportation of survivors to concentration camps, where they were killed. The Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto did not go quietly to their deaths but engaged in armed resistance. This riveting volume describes the ghetto's daily life--the people's extraordinary efforts to survive under horrendous circumstances--and the events that led to the uprising and the ghetto's 1943 destruction.

What Pastors Wish Church Members Knew

Helping People Understand and Appreciate Their Leaders

What Pastors Wish Church Members Knew

Pastors face a nearly impossible position! Even happy, healthy pastors struggle with pressures, pains, and fears unique to their position. If pastors were given an opportunity to speak honestly, openly, and anonymously about themselves, their families, and their churches, what would they say?What Pastors Wish Church Members Knew provides that opportunity. Based on anonymous and honest interviews and surveys, a national cross-section of hundreds of pastors speak out about their personal life, faith, health, wife, children, finances, greatest joys, frustrations, disappointments, greatest fears, and dreams. And you’ll learn how you can better help and encourage your pastor. This is insightful and encouraging reading for anyone who cares about the future of the church. This is a companion to the book What Women Wish Pastors Knew.

Behind Nazi Lines

My Father's Heroic Quest to Save 149 World War II POWs

Behind Nazi Lines

In 1944, hundreds of Allied soldiers were trapped in POW camps in occupied France. The odds of their survival were long. The odds of escaping, even longer. But one-man had the courage to fight the odds . . . An elite British S.A.S. operative on an assassination mission gone wrong. A Jewish New Yorker injured in a Nazi ambush. An eighteen-year-old Gary Cooper lookalike from Mobile, Alabama. These men and hundreds of other soldiers found themselves in the prisoner-of-war camps off the Atlantic coast of occupied France, fighting brutal conditions and unsympathetic captors. But, miraculously, local villagers were able to smuggle out a message from the camp, one that reached the Allies and sparked a remarkable quest by an unlikely—and truly inspiring—hero. Andy Hodges had been excluded from military service due to a lingering shoulder injury from his college-football days. Devastated but determined, Andy refused to sit at home while his fellow Americans risked their lives, so he joined the Red Cross, volunteering for the toughest assignments on the most dangerous battlefields. In the fall of 1944, Andy was tapped for what sounded like a suicide mission: a desperate attempt to aid the Allied POWs in occupied France—alone and unarmed, matching his wits against the Nazi war machine. Despite the likelihood of failure, Andy did far more than deliver much-needed supplies. By the end of the year, he had negotiated the release of an unprecedented 149 prisoners—leaving no one behind. This is the true story of one man’s selflessness, ingenuity, and victory in the face of impossible adversity.

Orchestra of Exiles

The Story of Bronislaw Huberman, the Israel Philharmonic, and the One Thousand Jews He Saved from Nazi Horrors

Orchestra of Exiles

The compelling biography of the violinist who founded the Palestine Symphony Orchestra and saved hundreds of people from Hitler—as seen in Josh Aronson’s documentary Orchestra of Exiles. “The true artist does not create art as an end in itself. He creates art for human beings. Humanity is the goal.”—Bronislaw Huberman At fourteen, Bronislaw Huberman played the Brahms Violin Concerto in Vienna— winning high praise from the composer himself, who was there. Instantly famous, Huberman began touring all over the world and received invitations to play for royalty across Europe. But after witnessing the tragedy of World War I, he committed his phenomenal talent and celebrity to aid humanity. After studying at the Sorbonne in Paris, Huberman joined the ranks of Sigmund Freud and Albert Einstein in calling for peace through the Pan European Movement. But when hope for their noble vision was destroyed by the rise of Nazism, Huberman began a crusade that would become his greatest legacy—the creation, in 1936, of the Palestine Symphony, which twelve years later became the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. In creating this world-level orchestra, Huberman miraculously arranged for the very best Jewish musicians and their families to emigrate from Nazi-threatened territories. His tireless campaigning for the project—including a marathon fundraising concert tour across America—ultimately saved nearly a thousand Jews from the approaching Holocaust. Inviting the great Arturo Toscanini to conduct the orchestra’s first concert, Huberman’s clarion call of art over cruelty was heard around the world. His story contains estraordinary adventures, riches and royalty, politicians and broken promises, losses and triumphs. Against near impossible obstacles, Huberman refused to give up on his dream to create a unique and life-saving orchestra of exiles which was one of the great cultural achievements of the 20th century. Includes Photographs

The Holocaust Diaries: Book Iii

A Homeland for the Just

The Holocaust Diaries: Book Iii

Book Three A HOMELAND FOR THE JUST The Holocaust concerning Palestine and the licensing problem and anti-Semitism in the State Department during World War II To assist in the rescuing of the Jews in Europe, Roosevelt and the WEJ see that the establishment of a homeland for the Jews in Palestine is a necessity. He not only condones the use of violence to attain this end, but also subscribes to elaborate schemes to bribe Arab leaders, specifically King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia, in order to realize the formation of a Jewish State. Also in defiance of Assistant Secretary of State, Breckinridge Long, and his colleagues at the State Department who attempt to thwart Roosevelt's Palestine policies and European rescue plans, Roosevelt simultaneously initiates and supports the covert transfer of "Joint and US funds to Joint and WEJ contacts in Europe to save, ransom, or assist Jews anywhere even if the funds fall into enemy hands as bribes or pad Nazi bank accounts. He agrees with the WEJ to violate US law and by-pass his anti-Semitic State Department. It is Henry Morgenthau and his boys at the Treasury Department who compile data and evidence that Long and his people are anti-Semitic and are intentionally blocking Roosevelt's Palestine policies and the licensing and transfer of funds to Europe. They submit a secret report to Roosevelt entitled PERSONAL REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT ON THE ACQUIESCENCE OF THIS GOVERNMENT IN THE MURDER OF THE JEWS, JANUARY 16, 1944, which documents State's anti-Semitic activities and, if made public, would inflict a severe blow to the Roosevelt administration particularly during a presidential election year. Within days of its presentation to Roosevelt, this report leads to the formation of Roosevelt's War Refugee Board and to its overt public mission to save European Jewry. -- Leo V. Kanawada, Jr.

The Holocaust Diaries: Book V

The Innocence of the Just

The Holocaust Diaries: Book V

Book Five THE INNOCENCE OF THE JUST The Holocaust in Hungary and Slovakia during World War II In 1944, Hitler refuses to abandon his plans to deport the last remaining, huge concentration of Jews in Europe. Over one million Jews live relatively untouched in Hungary. He calls for the renovation and enlargement of the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland. It's only at this time that Roosevelt and the rest of the world learn the truth about Auschwitz and the extermination camps of Poland. To bomb the camps then becomes a grave issue. Discovering also from these covert reports that Heinrich Himmler, Hitlers second-in-command and head of the SS, is willing to secretly negotiate with Roosevelt to end the war, Roosevelt sees the opportunity to preserve even more of the Jews in Europe. He decides to use them as his bargaining chip and sole condition for opening negotiations with Himmler. In the meantime, under the guise of needing a hundred thousand able-bodied Hungarian laborers and their families for the war effort back in Germany, Hitler hoodwinks the elderly Regent of Hungary, Miklos Horthy, and overseas a swift occupation of Hungary in March of 1944 by his Wehrmacht. Over four hundred thousand Jews are deported to Auschwitz in less than two months time by Adolf Eichmann's SS and the newly-installed, pro-Nazi and pro-German quisling Hungarian government and its thousands of rightist police. When Horthy learns the truth about Auschwitz and receives pressure from Roosevelt and the Vatican, he re-exerts his authority and halts the deportations. After an assassination attempt on Hitler in July of 1944, Himmler is encouraged by his associates to also exert his authority and approach Roosevelt's representatives in Switzerland to initiate serious negotiations to bring about a separate peace and an end to the persecution of the Jews. ; Leo V. Kanawada, Jr.

Children's Wartime Diaries

Secret Writings from the Holocaust and World War II

Children's Wartime Diaries

To mark the 50th anniversary of the end of the Second World War, here is an extraordinary anthology of diaries written by children in Nazi-occupied Europe. With a scope that encompasses the entire war, the breadth of Europe, the London Blitz and the Warsaw ghetto, the diaries are as powerful as The Diary of Anne Frank .The children, who are from all over Europe, write in spare, searing prose of life in ghettos and concentration camps, of bombings, strafings and Blitzkriegs, of dreams and death, fear and courage, tragedy and transcendence. Their voices and their vision will move us all.