Showa 1926-1939

A History of Japan

Showa 1926-1939

A fascinating period in Japanese history explored by a master of manga Showa 1926–1939: A History of Japan is the first volume of Shigeru Mizuki's meticulously researched historical portrait of twentieth-century Japan. This volume deals with the period leading up to World War II, a time of high unemployment and other economic hardships caused by the Great Depression. Mizuki's photo-realist style effortlessly brings to life the Japan of the 1920s and 1930s, depicting bustling city streets and abandoned graveyards with equal ease. When the Showa era began, Mizuki himself was just a few years old, so his earliest memories coincide with the earliest events of the time. With his trusty narrator Rat Man, Mizuki brings history into the realm of the personal, making it palatable, and indeed compelling, for young audiences as well as more mature readers. As he describes the militarization that leads up to World War II, Mizuki's stance toward war is thoughtful and often downright critical—his portrayal of the Nanjing Massacre clearly paints the incident (a disputed topic within Japan) as an atrocity. Mizuki's Showa 1926–1939 is a beautifully told history that tracks how technological developments and the country's shifting economic stability had a role in shaping Japan's foreign policy in the early twentieth century.

Yurei

The Japanese Ghost

Yurei

An eerie yet insightful exploration into the phenomenon of yurei, or Japanese ghosts, both past and present.

Graphic Novels in High School and Middle School Classrooms

A Disciplinary Literacies Approach

Graphic Novels in High School and Middle School Classrooms

The ultimate guide for using graphic novels in any middle school or high school classroom, this book considers how the graphic novel format can support critical thinking and help reach disciplinary goals in history, English language arts, science, math, fine arts, and other subjects. Using specific graphic novels as examples, this book considers how to help students read, question, and write about both fiction and non-fiction. Whether teachers are new to graphic novels or have been working with them for years, this book will help improve instruction. Chapters ell us how to teach with graphic novels, focusing on how disciplinary literacy can inform graphic novel instruction; how readers should consider text, image, and the intersection of the two when reading a graphic novel; and how graphic novels can encourage critical response and interdisciplinary instruction. Throughout the book, the authors illustrate important teaching concepts with examples from recent graphic novels. Appendices offer recommendations of graphic novels ideal for different disciplines. Teachers who are serious about using graphic novels effectively in the classroom will find this book invaluable.

The Supernatural Cats of Japan

The Supernatural Cats of Japan

An in-depth exploration of the sometimes charming, sometimes gruesome feline creatures and ghosts of Japan. Davisson illuminates the vast realm of kaibyō, or supernatural cats, with historical and modern cultural context. Lushly illustrated in full color with dozens of ukiyo-e prints and drawings. A must-have book for the Japanophile and cat-lover alike! First in a forthcoming series about the supernatural animals of Japan. "Kaibyō: The Supernatural Cats of Japan is an extremely diverting and stunningly produced celebration of the phantom feline in its myriad of manifestations--some alluring, others humorous and many outright terrifying. Award-winning translator, writer, lecturer, manga scholar, Japanese folklore expert and author ofYūrei: The Japanese Ghost, Zach Davisson is the ideal guide to this furred and fanged underworld. An expertly researched and engagingly penned text is embellished by the inclusion of an intriguing selection of uncanny cat tales by other authors and centuries' old legends newly-translated by Mr. Davisson. The publishers must be congratulated for creating a book of extraordinary lavishness. Although a paperback release, no expense has been spared in an exquisitely-designed book brimming with a toothsome array of full-color artwork reproductions." review by Scot D. Ryersson and Michael Orlando Yaccarino, co-authors ofInfinite Variety: The Life and Legend of the Marchesa Casati andThe Marchesa Casati: Portraits of a Muse Zack Davisson is an award-winning translator, writer, and scholar of Japanese folklore and ghosts. He is the author ofYūrei: The Japanese Ghost (Chin Music Press), translator of Eisner Award-winning and Harvey-nominated Shigeru Mizuki'sShowa 1926-1939: A History of Japan, and a 2014 nominee of the Japanese-US Friendship Commission Translation Prize. Other translation works include the famous folklore comic Kitaro (Drawn and Quarterly) and the works of Satoshi Kon (Dark Horse).

Poland between the Wars, 1918–1939

Poland between the Wars, 1918–1939

Incorporating selective papers from a successful conference organised by the Polish Society, this book presents challenging and frequently revisionist views on a variety of controversial themes relating to the interwar Polish Republic, including its struggle over Upper Silesia, the question of national identity and its ethnic minorities, the significance of the Battle of Warsaw, the role of the press and its defence preparations in 1939. The volume thus makes an important contribution to scholarly debate of a crucial period in Poland's recent history.

Showa 1939-1944

A History of Japan

Showa 1939-1944

Tegneserie - graphic novel. A autobiographical and historical account of Showa-era Japan

Yurei: the Japanese Ghost

Yurei: the Japanese Ghost

Inspired by personal experiences with Japan's vengeful spirits, Davisson investigates the origins and legends of yurei.

Crime and Criminal Policy in Japan

Analysis and Evaluation of the Showa Era, 1926–1988

Crime and Criminal Policy in Japan

The Showa Era in Japan commenced in December 1926, when Emperor Showa ascended the Throne, and came to an end in January 1989, when His Majesty passed away, ushering in the new Heisei Era. The Showa Era was marked by drastic changes in the economy, society, and political and legal sys tems, which brought about an ebb and flow in criminality and precipitated various criminal policies. From an economical, political, and criminological perspective, the Showa Era stands out as a remarkable period in Japanese his tory. The Research and Training Institute of the Ministry of Justice, which has annually published the White Paper on Crime in Japan since 1960, received Cabinet approval to introduce a special topic section, "Criminal Policy in Sho wa" in the White Paper for 1989, which was published in October the same year. This White Paper is the first comprehensive publication that deals not only with the crime situation but also with the various activities of the criminal justice system, including the police, public prosecutors' offices, courts, correctional institutions, and probation and parole supervision organisations for 63 years.

Taming Oblivion

Aging Bodies and the Fear of Senility in Japan

Taming Oblivion

Examines the cultural construction of senility in Japan and the moral implications of dependent behavior for older Japanese.